Winner of Guitar Player / Osiamo Gear Giveaway

Michael-Irvine-1k-winner_10Congratulations to the winner of our Guitar Player / Osiamo Gear Giveaway, Michael I of California. Michael is the lucky recipient of a bunch of great gear including a Rockready Volo gig bag, Mini, and Snap! Strap, a Dr J Planes Walker Fuzz, a Bigfoot Engineering Trouble Booster, a Taurus Dexter Octaver, a Mooer Trelicopter, and a great selection of Pickboy picks. Michael was really excited to hear the news and says, “Thanks again for the great gifts. I will enjoy all of them.”

Michael, we hope make some great sounding music with your new gear!

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Exclusive Interview : Joao Castilho

Tell us about your musical background
I was born in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, in 1970, and started playing at age of 9. During my musical life, I’ve played with many great artists like Maria Bethânia, Djavan, Lisa Nilsson, Ed Motta, Sandra de Sá, Simone, Eumir Deodato, Zé Renato, Leny Andrade, Nana and Dori Caymmi, Pascoal Meirelles, among several others. In terms of education, from 15 to 18 years old, I had private lessons of acoustic and electric guitar. Since then I became autodidact, but at 2007 I had the chance to study harmony in a revolutionary way for 3 years with the trombone player Vittor Santos.

I released two solo CDs called “Equilibrium” and “Percepções” (you can check them at Spotfy). I also released two books: “Toque Junto” and “EstudandoImprovisação.” With the bass player Jefferson Lescowich, the drummer Renato Massa and the saxophone player Marcelo Martins, I formed the group FOCO, with two CDs released: “FOCO” and “Tempo Bom com Chuva”.

joaoCastilhoWhat are you working on now?
Right now I’m back to Djavan’s band. We just finished recording his last album. Also, I’ve been playing with Nana Caymmi among other artists, and composing music for TV shows, films and publicity.

What is the role of education in music?
If you are talented but have no music theory education, you will never know how far you could get.

How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?
Things are changing fast, especially for recording industry. The streaming market is forcing an adaptation of this segment, which is affecting other music businesses in different ways, such as concerts, film score, composers, etc.. Let’s see where it goes… We, as musicians, producers, composers, should be prepared to adapt.

joaoCastilho_pedalboard

Why do use Pickboy picks and Mooer pedals?
I’ve always liked Pickboy picks very much. Great quality, big variety of materials and lots of different shapes. About Mooer, they sound great, are small and light, which is everything I am looking for. Click here to learn more about Joao’s gear.

To learn more about Joao please feel free to visit www.joaocastilho.com.

Exclusive Interview : Jay Gore

Neal Walter caught up with Jay Gore at this week’s Luck Strike Live session in Hollywood. Jay, just back from a tour in South Korea, talked with Neal about his his career and showed off his Rockready gig bag and his custom Pickboy picks.

What’s your musical background?

I’m an LA native. When I was 13 I had a band and we’d play the songs we wrote at the Sunset Strip clubs. I went to G.I.T. for a year when I was 17 and I’ve been a working session and touring player ever since.

What are you working on now?

I just finished recording all the guitars on the new Warren Hill CD, Under the Influence. It’s an amazing collection of classic 70s and 80s rock songs done instrumentally, but true to their original forms and styles. Also, I’m getting ready for a small tour of Asia and writing for my second CD, a follow-up to my first CD, Identity, which is available on CDBaby and iTunes and JayGore.com.

What is the role of education in music?

I think it’s extremely important. It goes beyond learning musical theory, it teaches discipline and patience, which is so important when you have four days to learn a 90 minute show for that big pop star you’re going to tour the world with. It teaches how to speak to the other musicians that you’re working with. When you have an idea you’ll know how to explain it. Most importantly, it trains you how to be able to step into any musical situation and adapt to it, instantly.

How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?

I feel that the music industry is near death…and by that I mean on monetary level for artists. There will always be music and musicians and gigs. Monetizing it all is becoming far more difficult. For some reason creating art for “exposure” became more important than paying your bills. Lots of people are making a lot of money in music. Most musicians are not.

jayGoreCustomPickboyWhy do use Pickboy Picks?

Very simply, Pickboy picks are the very best for me. I’ve used them over 20 years. I love the great tip, it makes articulation so much easier. The material helps the pick to glide off the strings with far less friction between the string and pick. And, I just love the size of the picks that I use (PB14P100 Classic), they’re just a hair smaller than other picks. Bottom line…I play better with a Pickboy!!!

 

Click here to read more about Jay Gore.

Exclusive Interview : Sid Griffin

1) Tell us about your musical background?

I was the ringleader of 1980s indie heroes The Long Ryders. We were second only to the Replacements in the USA as Hip Indie Band of the time and second only to the Smiths in Europe for the same time, same thing. We were part of a movement in the USA called the Paisley Underground which was a major deal in L.A. thirty years ago. It was quite a scene, equal to Liverpool in 1963 or NYC in 1977.

2) What are you working on now?

I play bluegrass with a British band here in London called the Coal Porters and I play solo singer-songwriter gigs. The Coal Porters have five albums out and all of my music, solo or band, is on Spotify and iTunes should someone want to check me out. The Coal Porters play mainly in the UK and North America but we play a few festivals in Europe every summer.

I also do solo gigs all around the world. I have played everywhere from Hollywood to Hong Kong, San Francisco to Syracuse to Sydney to Stoke-On-Trent as a solo act and am doing that most of this month.

3) What is the role of education in music?

Without music there would not be enough Art to separate us from the beasts! I am heartsick our schools, both in my native USA and in my adopted English hometown of London, do not have nearly enough emphasis (or budget!) to give music a greater role in the classroom and in the upbringing of our children, who are after all not only the next generation of musicians but the next generation of leaders.

Listening to music is part of daily life for almost everyone on Earth but I feel playing music, any music at all, classical or folk or whatever, is crucial to learning how to work and adapt to others. And how to work with and adapt to your own strengths and weaknesses. It is not only how a person learns who they are and what they can do it is how a person learns who others are and how important they are to him or her through the music they make together as part of an ensemble.

4) How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?

Right now the music industry is coming to grips with the digital age. We are still seeing the transition from a generation, like previous generations, who expected a hard copy such as an LP or a CD and a generation which will hardly own any hard copies at all. My daughter is fifteen and plays guitar, piano and violin. She has about fifteen CDs, no vinyl and tons of things on her MP3 player. My son is five and he will own no hard copies of music unless I leave him my hefty collection of vinyl and CDs in my will!

And yes, I think musicians deserve to be paid for their music! It breaks my heart people think because something is digitally available it is free. My bands and I deserve to be paid for our labours and so does your band!

5) Why do use Pickboy guitar picks?

I used the Pickboy 1.00 hard pick. It never leaves your hand due to perspiration, it is balanced perfectly and the THWACK it makes against the string itself never dominates the sound. The pick is part of the sound and the music and helping you control it by the way you hold the pick, by the tightness of your grip and so forth, and the Pickboys I use stay in my hand every time. Like a loyal St. Bernard these picks do exactly as they are told! They are the best by far in my mind’s eye and I can hear this.

Learn more about Sid Giffin on Sid’s artist page.

Exclusive Interview from Brazil : Samp!

1) Tell us about your musical background

Since early childhood, I started digging music from my parents CD’s, where I found my first influences: Eric Clapton, The Police & Pink Floyd.  From age of 3 to 10 that was it. I started to play guitar when I was 12 years old, a year afterwards I personally met one of my major influences on guitar: Jimmy Page. And since that day, I never put down the guitar. As s teenager I was listening to lots of different genres. I was hooked up on Joe Satriani, but I was also listening to Oscar Peterson, Ben Webster, Ella Fitzgerald, B.B.King and Sinatra because my mother was constantly listening to them at home. While my father was passionate about Steely Dan, U2, Boston, The Rolling Stones and of course, Tom Jobim. I was definitely very influenced by Eddie Van Halen in my early twenties, and have always considered myself very hard-rock oriented. From AC/DC to Guns N’Roses, Kiss, Whitesnake, Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, Led Zeppelin.. Well the list goes on and on.. But if I had to pick just one, which is a VERY hard thing to do with so many amazing players, I would definitely pick Jimmy Page. Not only because of his music, but since I had the opportunity to personally met him, not once but several times during my teens, I can securely say he influenced me the most. Jimmy gave me so many great insights and advice. I will be forever grateful for that.

2) What are you working on now?

I am currently recording my new solo album, which will feature lots of guests from all over the globe. Some from New York, others from Rio de Janeiro – Brazil, and also a great singer from Johannesburg, South Africa.

Then, I am moving to London, UK.

3) What is the role of education in music?

Music represents so much of the culture of one nation, of a generation, of individuals. Try to put music in words.. It’s impossible. I mean, I am sure you can, but do you really think words do justice to this divine thing music is? Music has completely changed my life – has shaped me into who I am today, have kept me out of trouble and focused on what was really important for me. I have been a private guitar instructor for a bit over than 6 years now, so I have seen the impact music has caused in people’s lives. It simply changes it, for the better. The more educated and cultured people get, more positive, intelligent and respectful the society becomes and therefore, more value the profession gets, stimulating new aspiring musicians and artists. Education is everything. It would be great to see in the future, a world where schools around the globe would offer music classes.

4) How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?

As far as my understanding goes, I feel like we are in the middle of a shift, a transition, reflections from the technology revolution. The modern music industry as we know nowadays is a little older than a century, right? And music exists ever since humanity started. So what is happening right now, is a shift, a period of adaptation, which measured in time – it’s nothing if compared to all the years of existence of the music industry. Illegal downloads are being prohibited world-wide, and eventually we will get to a point where no one will ever be able to illegally download a song anymore. The world has changed a lot, and in record time actually. For example: Facebook is the largest media company in the world, but doesn’t produce any content. Air B’n’B is the biggest accommodation company in the world, but they actually don’t own any property. Same with Uber – the biggest taxi company ever, they do not own a single car in their fleet. My point being is, everything has changed. And now we are all adapting to these new circumstances, creating new rules, laws, roles, jobs and basically, doing tests so that eventually we gonna have better answers, and therefore a more solid, fair and remunerated system – or market if you will – to our music industry. I would say, I am definitely optimistic about it.

5) Why do use Pickboy picks?

Well, firstly I simply love them. I really love heavy picks, but I also like the feel of a slim pick, with a nice grip on it. It seems quite impossible to get that combination, but Pickboy just nailed it. So many great picks, the Pos-a-grip series, or the Classic one – either the Vintage or the Luminous.

Secondly, I strong believe that in an era with thousands of great players everywhere, with boosted exposure granted by the Internet era, it becomes quite hard to be highlighted as an unique player among so many great ones. Considering that, in the beginning of my career I chose build for myself a killer setup which would give me the most unique tone ever, in some sort of way. And the most important part of your tone is definitely your hands and your approach towards the guitar. Having a pick in your hands that feels so great, almost like if it was glued to your fingers, becoming part of them, it’s absolutely priceless.

samp-Pickboy-Rio

6) What gave you the idea to take Pickboy on location?

That’s a good one! Where to start..? I am very passionate about photography and I think the world we live in has lots of stunning places, and incredible landscapes. When advertising gear, usually artists take shots from the stage or inside a studio – which is cool too – but I felt like there was something missing.

I was thinking to myself, what kinda shot would be really inspiring? How can I, somehow, enrich people’s cultural lives unintentionally but at the same time, directly? Because that’s what it is. When sharing those shots, which through a common interest (in this case the Pickboy picks), connects with many others, we end up sharing the world with them. Famous sights, breath-taking landscapes from places that maybe none of them have ever been, wouldn’t dream of going, or maybe can relate to, because they have been there before or they live there – especially knowing that Pickboy is such an international brand!

So it all started when I was back in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, visiting my family, doing a few sessions, and suddenly I found myself in the middle of such an exotic city, with breath taking sightseeing places, a camera in my hands and my famous Blue Pick from Pickboy in my pocket.. You can imagine the result. After a very positive feedback from fans, I knew I had hit something and now I am constantly exploring new and exquisite places, always looking for the next shot.

Learn more about Samp here.

KC Music Grand Opening Party – a HUGE Success!

kcMusicStoreFront

Our newest dealer for Pickboy, Dr J and Mooer, KC Music, opened on October 4th with a big party, seven bands, prizes, guest appearances and so on. We asked the owner, Mark Ballard some questions about why he decided to get into MI retail.

You just opened a store so you must think the future of MI retailing is looking up.  Have you had experience working in MI retail? Would you share some of your thoughts with us?
I have never been in retail, not one second in my entire life – so I have no history to base my opinions on, just wild-eyed, naive enthusiasm. I have been told that I am insane to be be opening a B&M store period, but I believe I have a better idea. Once we get our store open and figure out a few more things we will begin lessons. We have five lesson rooms and lots of applicants for instructor positions. Our ace in the hole is our group/performance program that will commence in March once my non-compete contract is satisfied with School of Rock, LLC. At that point I am opening The KC Blues Academy, ,The KC Country Music Academy and KC Rock University, all  performance based programs that will maximize revenue. Individual lessons will be given in the store and group rehearsals will be held off-site because they are loud. The students’ discounted purchases will help the retail end survive the internet and GC who is opening a location about five miles away next year. I dislike them very much for the way they have treated friends of mine (former employees) and for the way they treated me during my 10 years at School of Rock

Why do you think Pickboy, Mooer and Dr J will do well at your store?
I am hoping that Mooer and Dr. J will be big sellers and I will be touting their compact, tru-bypass attributes and their affordability. Pickboy will be a snap to sell, I imagine I will be ordering more after Black Friday. Great stocking stuffers for the guitarist who things he or she has everything.

 

Biggest challenge for your KC Music for this year and beyond?
Our biggest challenge is making sure that *we never let down in terms of promotion and in-store events* (we have a cool stage, PA and backline permanently installed, we can also multi-track from the stage with a flip of a switch and a couple clicks on our computer) and seeking publicity opportunities. I am very good at this aspect of the business, so part of my focus will be there *every single day.*

Osiamo Music Gear Goes International, endorses Brazilian Guitarist Pedro Sampaio!

Pedro Sampaio with Antenna

Pedro Sampaio, aka, Samp, born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and now 24 years old is a session guitarist, songwriter, film composer and guitar instructor. Since early childhood, Samp started digging music from his parents CDs, where he got his first influences: Eric Clapton, The Police & Pink Floyd. He started playing guitar when he was 12, a year after he personally met one his major influences on guitar, Jimmy Page. Since that day, he has never put his guitar down.

Samp kicks-off his career at 19, when he started giving guitar lessons. Soon after he started doing studios sessions in Rio de Janeiro. Those sessions brought a few opportunities for Samp. Mainly composing soundtracks for movies, and also inspired him to start his first band Antenna.

Samp recorded his first album with the band Antenna and recorded a live DVD with the band, which you can see in this teaser.

In 2014 Samp moved to New York City to attend an internship at the widely-known Big Foote Music + Sound studios. He recorded guitar and also got the chance to get acquainted with recording jingles for commercials.

He was introduced to Pickboy by his friend and fellow endorser John Murphy. Says Samp, “John Murphy, told me about that one.. the Pickboy Metacarbonate Pos A Grip 1.00mm, and I went mad! Best of both worlds!”

Samp plays PICKBOY picks which is the pick of choice for other successful artists such as John Mayer, Lita Ford, John Murphy, Jay Gore and Duane T. Jones.