Christian Colabelli Interview




Artist Spotlight

Can you share a brief description of your musical background (gigs, tours and recording projects etc)?

I always had a fascination with music and actually played saxophone before becoming completely fixated with guitar at age 13. Early on, I was greatly influenced by Van Halen and Slash and would lock myself in my room and learn their solos note for note. When I discovered the world of jazz and fusion, a light bulb went off. I listened relentlessly to Mike Stern, Tal Farlow, John McLaughlin, Allan Holdsworth, Alex Machacek and Pat Martino. I attended and graduated Berklee College of music and was exposed to a universe of musical knowledge. I had the undeniable privilege of playing and recording with drum legend, Rakalam Moses (Pat Metheny, Gary Burton) and was a three-time member of Mark White’s advanced guitar ensemble, “The Eklektik Elektriks.” I also did a few tours on Holland America Cruise Line’s Veendam and Westerdam as a member of the Halcats. I played with the JT Project, an up and coming jazz band out of NYC with Nathan Webb on drums (Kenny Garrett). I’ve recorded on countless studio sessions in a plethora of styles from pop to shred. I started working with my main band and source of passionate inspiration, Boy Meets Machine, in 2009 and we’re currently playing a ton of shows all over the map.

What do you have going on now?

As I mentioned before, my main focus right now is my original project, Boy Meets Machine. We’ve showcased for Grand Hustle records and are really trying to get our name out to as many people as possible. We’ve got a diehard legion of fans and each show is getting bigger and bigger. I also play with a fantastic cover band called Johnny Drama that plays up and down the east coast. Last year we played over 150 shows in some really high profile venues such as House of Blues, and the Borgata in Atlantic City. I was recently endorsed by Vigier Guitars and will probably be doing a bunch of clinics in the upcoming year. They make unrivaled instruments and I’m happy to be part of their team. I’m still doing studio work here and there as well and also teach a bunch of lessons. I try to stay as busy as humanly possible.

Where do you see the direction of music going in the future?

I think music is in limbo right now. The industry seems to be in a perpetual state of flux and it’s a very trying time for original artists. It’s really become a “do it yourself” operation. Record companies are being phased out and record sales have plummeted. Digital media has become the standard and it’s blatantly obvious that the tangible aspect of being able to possess an album and its artwork has taken a back seat to an itunes playlist. We are dominated by a world of “singles,” and substance has been traded in for production and entertainment value. Shows like “American Idol” have completely devalued the original artist and turn music into a popularity contest. It’s tough to stomach at times. The only way to persevere is to be incredibly well educated and business savvy and to have an iron will.

What role did music education have on your career?

Music Education definitely paved a solid foundation for my growth as a musician. The Harmony and Ear Training classes I was enrolled in at Berklee were absolutely invaluable. Obviously, the exposure to great players and teachers was truly life altering. That goes without saying. Perhaps the most underrated and important aspect of my time at this institution was the networking aspect. I was able to make a massive amount of contacts that keep panning out for me in my professional life. It’s all about having a personality and reaching out to people. Tenacity is the most important quality of a successful musician.

Why do you like Pickboy picks?

I use Pickboy Picks because they have the best tone, consistent response, and lighting fast rebound off of the strings. To me, the give the player the greatest sense of control. I can’t tell you the graveyard of picks that I’ve amassed throughout the years. I’ve tried every brand and make from standard to boutique and nothing matches up to a Pickboy Pos-a-Grip Jazz 1.5 in my opinion. Pickboy makes a stellar product and I hope to be working with them for years to come.

Thiago Trinsi Interview

Can you share a brief description of your musical background (gigs, tours and recording projects etc)?

My name is Thiago Trinsi, from Porto Alegre-RS south of Brazil, I am one of the guitarist in Seraphim, a heavy metal band with the CD Rising released world wide by King Records-Japan. I am composer, jam session player, arranger, orchestrator of music for films and I am also a music instructor in the north part of Iceland where I have been since 2005. My works also include guitar clinics, master classes, performing and recording. I am endorsed by Pickboy, Dean Markley, Spectraflex, and Wilson Effects.

What do you have going on now?

I had a very successful guitar clinic at Sam Ash in New York last week and I am here in Florida now doing Master Classes in Tampa, and in August I will be back in Iceland and continue the process with my album, my book – which is ready – and an instructional video to record.

Where do you see the direction of music going in the future?

Everybody loves music, and I believe they will keep consuming it forever; with the internet many those great undergrounds artists became popular in now days, What I see now is many great artists around but not a mainstream as it was before and for the future I just see the expansion of it.

What role did music education have on your career?

I have a very technical knowledge today but I got most researching by my own and everyone can do that and reach a very high level of musicality without been in a music institution. What I get with the music education is a better salary but just when I am working as a teacher for some music institution. But if you are a performer, composer or a privet teacher what counts the most is your talent.

Why do you like Pickboy Picks?

For many years picks were just picks for me, ’till I get a chance to try those Meta Carbonate picks by Pickboy so I could understand how necessary is for an artist to have the best, the best amp, guitar and of course the best guitar pick. With Pickboy Meta Carbonate picks I could sound so much better.

Visit Thiago’s artist page on www.OSIAMO.com

Booker King Interview

Artist Spotlight : Booker King

For those us not hip tell us a little bit about your playing history?
I’m trained and I self taught myself somethings I never would have learned in school. I play both electric and upright. I play all styles of music. I’ve played rock with Santana and Corey Glover. R n B with Stephanie Mills and Bobby Caldwell. Jazz with Dean Brown. Bop with Jane Sieberry, Kelis and Paul Simon. World Music with Angelique Kidjo and Lila Downs. I also played on the soundtrack to the film, “Cowboy Bebop”

What are you doing presently?
I just finished a new record with Tomas Doncker which I co-wrote a song. There is a Broadway show in previews that I played on the soundtrack called ‘The 12″ .

What are your views on the future of music?
You have to be able to play. CD’s are basically free on the internet now so live playing is where it’s at.

What do you feel the role of education is in regards to music?
Young musicians are interested in playing again. We lost an entire generations in the 80’s to computers and sequencers. I took a lot of gigs that should have gone to younger players who just weren’t around.

You are one of the earliest endorsees for R. Cocco. Why do you use R. Cocco strings?
They sound sweet from begining to end. I use to change strings every 3 to 4 days. With Cocco’s I can change them every 3 to 4 weeks (unless i’m on tour) I use them for live as well as recording. These strings are like when a saxophone player gets a good reed. He just plays it to the bitter end. These strings are a big part of my sound.

Andrea Giribaldi Interview

Artist Spotlight

Can you share a brief description of your musical background (gigs, tours and recording projects etc)?
I started playing guitar at the age of 12, inspired by great guitarists as Brian May, Adrian Smith, Marty Friedman and Jeff Loomis. I founded my band, Red Warlock, in 2005, whom I had great satisfaction playing with, as the chanche to share the stage with artists as Raven and Labyrinth. We’ve also been confirmed in Play it Loud fest bill, together with Agent Steel, Destruction, Diamond Head and others bands, but unfortunately the show was canceled. I worked on the making of many albums, as a musician and as a producer. I played on 13 albums, both with my current band and bands I used to play with, and guested in other bands works.

What do you have going on now?
Right now I’m working on the mastering of an Omen’s tribute album, which will be released in autumn, by MyGraveyard Productions, also Red Warlock’s label. At present Red Warlock are trying to set shows outside of Italy; at the moment we have contacts with UK and Denmark, and we’re working hard in order to find many venues as possible.

Where do you see the direction of music going in the future?
I think Being a musician is the best job ever, but unfortunately it’s getting harder and harder. What motivates me and myband is the love for music, and the art it encloses. But Being a musician nowadays is a tough, exhausting job, it needs great efforts and sacrifices, which, the most of times, seem to be useless, and you get frustrated and resigned. That’s why musicians are fewer and fewer: this art is dying. I really hope things will change somedays, and get better… But I think it’s really hard.

What role did music education have on your career?
For sure my education had a fundamental role for my formation as a professional musician. I studied many aspects of music, starting from piano, classic guitar, composition and electronic music; I took what I needed from each course, in order to have a background that would allow me to do what I wanted to, in the best way. Obviously, the more you practice, the more you learn.

Why do you like Pickboy picks?
I always used several models of Pickboy picks; they’ve always be the best choice for me, as they’re comfortable and the best ones for the best sound.

Tomas Doncker Interview




Artist Spotlight : Tomas Doncker


Would you tell us a little bit about your playing history?


I came up in the 80’s with the NO WAVE scene. I was a punk funker. I’ve played with the likes of James White and the Blacks (editors note: This was previous to me playing with James in the 90’s) I went on to play with Bootsy, Yoko Ono and Ivan Neville. I spent years in Japan performing, writing and recording.


What are you doing presently?


Presently I’m concentrating on my solo career. My group recently toured in China at the Shanghai Folk Festival. We are just finishing my new CD called, Power of the Trinity about Halle Selassie and the people of Ethiopa. The CD is being produced by Bill Laswell, one of my heroes and will be released in the Fall. We’re making what I call, “Groovy Sex Music” or “Global Soul”.


What do you have coming up in the future


We’ll be doing a college tour to coincide with the release of the CD. In the winter we’ll be back in St. Barths at “Le Baz’ for our annual residency. We have a monthly show at the Blue Note in NYC!


What do you feel the role of education is in regards to music?


Education is everything. Across the board, education is the key, not just in music but in life.

I think because of the saturation of ‘lesser’ product the audience is growing more in tune to what a “real artist” is. This is a great time for music. Even though the music business is smaller there is still a lot of music business o be done. In fact, you can even take courses in school on the Business of Music. That wasn’t available when I was in school.

Kids today are wearing Pink Floyd shirts. That means they done their homework and are educating themselves to what “real music’ is.


Why do you use R. Cocco strings?


I was turned on to the R. Cocco family of you, Ed and Alfonso by my bassist (and R, Cocco endorsee) Booker King. Quite frankly, R.Cocco’s are the best I’ve ever used. I used everything there is out there to use. String to string they are very balanced, stay in tune, consistent and long lasting.