Dr J Arsenal Distortion – Van Halen Guitar Lesson

Neal Walter shows off some of Eddie’s slick tapping licks while using the Dr J Arsenal Distortion pedal. Learn some tricks on how to master Hot for Teacher, a 12th fret A minor riff, and a bonus riff at the end with some cool string bending. Neal also talks about how to unlock the secret of getting not only the notes right but also getting the elusive Eddie “swing” feel.

D51 - Dr J Arsenal DistortionThe Dr J Arsenal Distortion gets a great Marshall tone and works well with many guitars and amps. You can get all kinds of distortion from classic British crunch to modern high-gain tones. There are 5 controls to give you total control over your tone and distortion. Click here to learn more about the Dr J Arsenal Distortion pedal or check out our Dr J Factory Tour and see where the pedals are made.

Dr J Factory Tour

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Our quick, virtual tour of the busy Dr J factory.

If you’re at all like us, you’re probably a bit curious how Dr J makes original design boutique quality pedals for so little. At the factory we got a look at how it’s all done.

From the start, the culture wall sets the tone. This is where Dr J sets the tone for the company. The wall is lined with images of the team and its accomplishments. Next stop the conference room for some high level discussions, then on the meeting room for a traditional ceremonial tea while discussing the products. Then comes materials, production, and testing. Then on to the extensive R&D department where there are many new products being developed.  And finally to Dee Leung, the principal designer for Dr J.

We’re really impressed with the factory and product. One thing many players forget is that all the Dr J pedals are original design. Dee has really done a great job of creating original interpretations of some classic pedals and adding his own twist.

Says, Tone Report, “Dr. J has taken the build quality, ingenuity and tweakability several steps further, while similarly offering the pedal board-friendly size and extreme value-to-tone ratio.” Click here to read the Tone Report review on the Shadow Echo.

We’re partial to the Shadow Echo for it’s spacey vibe, the Sparrow Driver & DI as a no nonsense bass pre-amp and driver, and the Green Crystal for it’s not so straight interpretation of a classic overdrive pedal. But all the pedals are really usable. The Planes Walker Fuzz has both germanium and silicon transistors and does a good job emulating the Supro Sound. And the Aerolite Comp and Armor Buffer and good additions to any pedal board.

But don’t take our word for it, check one out now at your local music store and discovery for yourself what Dr J is all about.

Whole Lotta Blues Crab – Neal Walter

Let Neal Walter share a secret with you that he learned from Steve Stevens about Led Zeppelin’s classic guitar riff in “Whole Lotta Love.” Seems Jimmy Page played an open D string in the riff to give it that little bit of mojo. Watch Neal demonstrate the difference with and without the open string.

The Mooer Blues Crab is the perfect pedal choice to get the heavy, bluesy sound out of a small amp like a Princeton Fender.

Exclusive Interview : Sid Griffin

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1) Tell us about your musical background?

I was the ringleader of 1980s indie heroes The Long Ryders. We were second only to the Replacements in the USA as Hip Indie Band of the time and second only to the Smiths in Europe for the same time, same thing. We were part of a movement in the USA called the Paisley Underground which was a major deal in L.A. thirty years ago. It was quite a scene, equal to Liverpool in 1963 or NYC in 1977.

2) What are you working on now?

I play bluegrass with a British band here in London called the Coal Porters and I play solo singer-songwriter gigs. The Coal Porters have five albums out and all of my music, solo or band, is on Spotify and iTunes should someone want to check me out. The Coal Porters play mainly in the UK and North America but we play a few festivals in Europe every summer.

I also do solo gigs all around the world. I have played everywhere from Hollywood to Hong Kong, San Francisco to Syracuse to Sydney to Stoke-On-Trent as a solo act and am doing that most of this month.

3) What is the role of education in music?

Without music there would not be enough Art to separate us from the beasts! I am heartsick our schools, both in my native USA and in my adopted English hometown of London, do not have nearly enough emphasis (or budget!) to give music a greater role in the classroom and in the upbringing of our children, who are after all not only the next generation of musicians but the next generation of leaders.

Listening to music is part of daily life for almost everyone on Earth but I feel playing music, any music at all, classical or folk or whatever, is crucial to learning how to work and adapt to others. And how to work with and adapt to your own strengths and weaknesses. It is not only how a person learns who they are and what they can do it is how a person learns who others are and how important they are to him or her through the music they make together as part of an ensemble.

4) How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?

Right now the music industry is coming to grips with the digital age. We are still seeing the transition from a generation, like previous generations, who expected a hard copy such as an LP or a CD and a generation which will hardly own any hard copies at all. My daughter is fifteen and plays guitar, piano and violin. She has about fifteen CDs, no vinyl and tons of things on her MP3 player. My son is five and he will own no hard copies of music unless I leave him my hefty collection of vinyl and CDs in my will!

And yes, I think musicians deserve to be paid for their music! It breaks my heart people think because something is digitally available it is free. My bands and I deserve to be paid for our labours and so does your band!

5) Why do use Pickboy guitar picks?

I used the Pickboy 1.00 hard pick. It never leaves your hand due to perspiration, it is balanced perfectly and the THWACK it makes against the string itself never dominates the sound. The pick is part of the sound and the music and helping you control it by the way you hold the pick, by the tightness of your grip and so forth, and the Pickboys I use stay in my hand every time. Like a loyal St. Bernard these picks do exactly as they are told! They are the best by far in my mind’s eye and I can hear this.

Learn more about Sid Giffin on Sid’s artist page.

Meet the Builder of the MxD : Joe Bochar

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What was your initial inspiration the led to the MxD?

Pedals began with the need to get crunchy tones thru a tube amp at low
volumes. I was playing with some guys and the local venues were very
small… anything over 30 watts was going to be over the top as far as
volume goes. I was using an old Princeton Reverb and even that was pushing
it… sometimes it ended up being a Vox AC4 thru a 1×12 cab. I wanted to
get a crunchy, plexi-ish sound at a low volume, but I also wanted to switch
some sort of “boost” to add some extra gain/grind for solos.

Do you play an instrument?

I do play… 30 years now! I don’t have a dedicated “pedalboard”, as
much as bring things to gigs depending on who I play with. Most of the time
it’s a modded wah, and MxD for classic rock guys. For more modern stuff (or
in situations I can really go off the deep end) I will add a Whammy 2, and
an FM-4 filter pedal.

What’s the strangest request you ever received (besides this questionnaire)?

Can’t think of anything “strange”.

Who are some of the more famous users and endorsees?’

We have Larry Mitchell using the pedal.

What’s coming up in 2015?

2015 looks to be an expansion year: larger shop/working area, more
designs/expand the pedal line, some limited run pedals. Moving forward one
step at a time.

Check out some of Joe’s super nice, hand-crafted guitars on his site.

www.jbguitars.com

MxD Guitar Overdrive Distortion Pedal Part 2 – Modern Hi Gain by Neal Walter

Part 2 of Neal’s  video review of the MxD overdrive/distortion pedal.  Part 2 covers a couple heavier, modern tonal possibilities. Most players comment on how playing through the MxD “feels” like playing through an amp. The MxD is one of the most flexible overdrive/distortion pedals on the market. Built in the USA, the MxD offers 3 modes with channel switching: clean boost, overdrive or distortion in classic or modern mode. The drive and saturation knob combined with diode clipping switch makes this pedal one of the richest sounding and most flexible overdrive pedals on the market.

More info: http://www.osiamo.com/MxD

Exclusive Interview from Brazil : Samp!

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1) Tell us about your musical background

Since early childhood, I started digging music from my parents CD’s, where I found my first influences: Eric Clapton, The Police & Pink Floyd.  From age of 3 to 10 that was it. I started to play guitar when I was 12 years old, a year afterwards I personally met one of my major influences on guitar: Jimmy Page. And since that day, I never put down the guitar. As s teenager I was listening to lots of different genres. I was hooked up on Joe Satriani, but I was also listening to Oscar Peterson, Ben Webster, Ella Fitzgerald, B.B.King and Sinatra because my mother was constantly listening to them at home. While my father was passionate about Steely Dan, U2, Boston, The Rolling Stones and of course, Tom Jobim. I was definitely very influenced by Eddie Van Halen in my early twenties, and have always considered myself very hard-rock oriented. From AC/DC to Guns N’Roses, Kiss, Whitesnake, Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, Led Zeppelin.. Well the list goes on and on.. But if I had to pick just one, which is a VERY hard thing to do with so many amazing players, I would definitely pick Jimmy Page. Not only because of his music, but since I had the opportunity to personally met him, not once but several times during my teens, I can securely say he influenced me the most. Jimmy gave me so many great insights and advice. I will be forever grateful for that.

2) What are you working on now?

I am currently recording my new solo album, which will feature lots of guests from all over the globe. Some from New York, others from Rio de Janeiro – Brazil, and also a great singer from Johannesburg, South Africa.

Then, I am moving to London, UK.

3) What is the role of education in music?

Music represents so much of the culture of one nation, of a generation, of individuals. Try to put music in words.. It’s impossible. I mean, I am sure you can, but do you really think words do justice to this divine thing music is? Music has completely changed my life – has shaped me into who I am today, have kept me out of trouble and focused on what was really important for me. I have been a private guitar instructor for a bit over than 6 years now, so I have seen the impact music has caused in people’s lives. It simply changes it, for the better. The more educated and cultured people get, more positive, intelligent and respectful the society becomes and therefore, more value the profession gets, stimulating new aspiring musicians and artists. Education is everything. It would be great to see in the future, a world where schools around the globe would offer music classes.

4) How do you feel about the current ‘state of the music industry’?

As far as my understanding goes, I feel like we are in the middle of a shift, a transition, reflections from the technology revolution. The modern music industry as we know nowadays is a little older than a century, right? And music exists ever since humanity started. So what is happening right now, is a shift, a period of adaptation, which measured in time – it’s nothing if compared to all the years of existence of the music industry. Illegal downloads are being prohibited world-wide, and eventually we will get to a point where no one will ever be able to illegally download a song anymore. The world has changed a lot, and in record time actually. For example: Facebook is the largest media company in the world, but doesn’t produce any content. Air B’n’B is the biggest accommodation company in the world, but they actually don’t own any property. Same with Uber – the biggest taxi company ever, they do not own a single car in their fleet. My point being is, everything has changed. And now we are all adapting to these new circumstances, creating new rules, laws, roles, jobs and basically, doing tests so that eventually we gonna have better answers, and therefore a more solid, fair and remunerated system – or market if you will – to our music industry. I would say, I am definitely optimistic about it.

5) Why do use Pickboy picks?

Well, firstly I simply love them. I really love heavy picks, but I also like the feel of a slim pick, with a nice grip on it. It seems quite impossible to get that combination, but Pickboy just nailed it. So many great picks, the Pos-a-grip series, or the Classic one – either the Vintage or the Luminous.

Secondly, I strong believe that in an era with thousands of great players everywhere, with boosted exposure granted by the Internet era, it becomes quite hard to be highlighted as an unique player among so many great ones. Considering that, in the beginning of my career I chose build for myself a killer setup which would give me the most unique tone ever, in some sort of way. And the most important part of your tone is definitely your hands and your approach towards the guitar. Having a pick in your hands that feels so great, almost like if it was glued to your fingers, becoming part of them, it’s absolutely priceless.

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6) What gave you the idea to take Pickboy on location?

That’s a good one! Where to start..? I am very passionate about photography and I think the world we live in has lots of stunning places, and incredible landscapes. When advertising gear, usually artists take shots from the stage or inside a studio – which is cool too – but I felt like there was something missing.

I was thinking to myself, what kinda shot would be really inspiring? How can I, somehow, enrich people’s cultural lives unintentionally but at the same time, directly? Because that’s what it is. When sharing those shots, which through a common interest (in this case the Pickboy picks), connects with many others, we end up sharing the world with them. Famous sights, breath-taking landscapes from places that maybe none of them have ever been, wouldn’t dream of going, or maybe can relate to, because they have been there before or they live there – especially knowing that Pickboy is such an international brand!

So it all started when I was back in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, visiting my family, doing a few sessions, and suddenly I found myself in the middle of such an exotic city, with breath taking sightseeing places, a camera in my hands and my famous Blue Pick from Pickboy in my pocket.. You can imagine the result. After a very positive feedback from fans, I knew I had hit something and now I am constantly exploring new and exquisite places, always looking for the next shot.

Learn more about Samp here.